Ask the Experts

Ask the Experts

Monday, January 28, 2019

WELL Stories

At IWBI, we're fortunate to collaborate with a diverse network of health aficionados through our WELL concept advisories.

At IWBI, we're fortunate to collaborate with a diverse network of health aficionados through our WELL concept advisories - learn more about our advisories here . These individuals support our work with WELL by providing input on solutions to health and wellness concerns, best practices for localization, case studies to fill research gaps and innovative topic areas.

And - through our "ask the experts" articles series - they're also weighing in on health-related questions from you.

In this first batch, we asked a few of our experts to answer common questions we receive about healthy lifestyle choices. Going forward, we invite you to submit your questions on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn by using #AskWELLexperts. Whether you're interested in finding balance or biohacking, we may use your submission in a future edition of "ask the experts."

Explore their science-backed advice below, and get started with adding more healthy habits to your routine.

NOURISHMENT

Dr. Megan Whelan says:

Checking the nutrition label is a great way to compare food products and make healthier, more informed choices. Nutrients of interest may be different for every person depending on their health priorities but the main nutrients of significance to align with healthy eating guidelines are fairly consistent world-wide. When checking the nutrition information on food labels it is useful to... Read more

Kate Spina says:

As consumers, we are bombarded with food advertising and a huge amount of choice at the checkout. Add the latest social media “superfood” trends or the newest diet your colleague told you about and our nutritional choices can be fraught with confusion. Luckily, knowing what information to look for on a nutrition label can... Read more

Dr. Megan Whelan says:

When it comes to choosing what to eat and drink during the day, we are often faced with overwhelming choice and temptation. This is a particular challenge in the workplace where we are often mentally overloaded and distracted, with reduced capacity (and willpower) to focus on optimal food choices. What if we could adapt our physical surroundings to make these healthy eating choices instinctive and easy, taking the battle out of food-related decision-making? Read more


MIND

Heidi Dening says:

There is no doubt that getting away from your desk at lunchtime seems to be an ever-increasing difficulty. I mean, who can take a break when there are so many deadlines, and it is just as easy to eat food while replying to emails? Common ‘justifications’ for mindlessly swallowing food while working are... Read more

Tara Healey and Jonathan Roberts say:

Fortunately, there is no shortage of ways to informally incorporate mindfulness practice into your day-to-day routine—the simpler the better, in many circumstances. For example—when getting out of bed in the morning, you can choose to take a moment to notice the basic physical sensations present in the body. This awareness can be drawn through the various routines that may follow...Read more

Tara Healey and Jonathan Roberts say:

As with so much related to mindfulness, the answer to this question is simple, yet not easy. The best time of day to practice is the time of day that works best for you. This is especially true when first starting out, when it’s important to make practice—which can seem daunting—as easy and accessible as possible...Read more


MOVEMENT

Dr. Lynn Herrmann says:

Walk more, any chance you get. Look for longer routes instead of short cuts. For example, use a restroom on a different level of your your office building or home. Do a "lap" around the office before heading to the breakroom for lunch. These short bouts of movement add up throughout the day.

Tom Bosna says:

Firstly, schedule movement into your calendar just as you would a work meeting or a social event and make it a priority. Movement breaks before, during and after work are essential for enhanced performance and wellbeing...Read more

Dr. Lynn Herrmann says:

If suggesting a standing up or walking meeting does not go over with the group, stand anyway! You'd be surprised how many people stand up at some point in the meeting because they want to try it too. All it takes is one person to break the status quo.

Tom Bosna says:

Workplace wellness programmes are effective when leadership teams not only invest financially but participate in the programme themselves. In order to achieve engagement from leadership teams for subsidised physical activity offerings I would suggest you point out three main benefits with precision: ...Read more