Manufacturer's Guide to WELL

Manufacturer's Guide to WELL

07 Nov 2017
/ Stephen Brown

As the global adoption of WELL continues to accelerate, product manufacturers have a unique opportunity to deliver new value to their clients and tap into a rapidly expanding market. If you’re a product manufacturer and want to learn how your products can support WELL requirements, check out our Manufacturer’s Guide to WELL.

The Manufacturer’s Guide to WELL

Reference the below guide to learn more about the features within each WELL concept that are relevant to the selection and production of furniture, flooring and other building materials.

Please note that WELL requirements cover the performance of materials, not the performance of the individual products or brands. Products that can be used to satisfy the WELL performance criteria can only contribute toward earning points required for WELL Certification; they cannot be said to earn points toward WELL Certification on their own.

We value the input and participation of manufacturers in supporting our shared mission to advance healthier people through better buildings.

FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS

AIR

Preconditions:

  • Feature 4, part 5

    • To minimize the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in building materials on indoor air quality, this feature outlines VOC emissions requirements for furniture and furnishings.

  • Feature 11, part 1

    • To reduce or eliminate occupant exposure to hazardous materials, this feature outlines restrictions and abatement strategies pertaining to lead, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

Optimizations:

  • Features 25, parts 1-3, 5

    • To minimize impact of hazardous building material chemicals on indoor air quality and support the health of manufacturing and maintenance workers, this feature outlines limitations or restrictions on ingredients such as perfluorinated compounds, flame retardants, phthalate (plasticizers), isocyanate-based polyurethane, and urea-formaldehyde.

  • Feature 26, part 1

    • To minimize the impact of hazardous building material ingredients on indoor air quality and help support the health manufacturing and maintenance workers, this feature outlines requirements for voluntary product screening programs for 25% of all furnishings, built-in furniture, interior finishes, and finish materials (calculated by cost).

  • Feature 28, part 1

    • To reduce occupant exposure to pathogens on high-touch surfaces, this feature outlines requirements for material properties and cleanability.

LIGHT

Optimizations:

  • Features 59

    • To increase overall room brightness through reflected light from room surfaces and avoiding glare, this feature outlines requirements for light reflectance values (LRV) for ceilings, walls, and furniture systems.

FITNESS

Optimizations:

  • Features 71

    • To reduce sedentary behavior by making active workstations readily available to occupants, this feature outlines requirements to incorporate active workstations and standing desks.

COMFORT

  • Feature 73, part 2

    • To reduce physical strain and maximize ergonomics and safety, this feature outlines requirements for screen, desk, and seat flexibility, including the provisions of at least 30% of workstations with the ability to alternate between sitting and standing positions through various combinations.

  • Feature 80, part 2c

    • To reduce sound reverberation and maintain comfortable sound levels though absorptive ceiling and wall surfaces, this feature outlines requirements for noise reduction coefficients (NRC) for ceilings and walls. Flooring, furniture, and furnishings can contribute to spatial acoustic levels.

MIND

Optimizations:

  • Feature 97

    • To promote material transparency along the supply chain, this feature outlines transparency and accessibility to material ingredient exposures.

FLOORING MANUFACTURERS

AIR

Preconditions:

  • Feature 4, part 3

    • To minimize the effect of VOCs in building materials on indoor air quality, this Feature outlines VOC emissions requirements for flooring.

  • Feature 11, part 1

    • To reduce or eliminate occupant exposure to hazardous materials, this Feature outlines restrictions and abatement strategies pertaining to lead, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  • Feature 25, parts 2-3

    • To minimize impact of hazardous building material chemicals on indoor air quality and help support the health of manufacturing and maintenance workers, this feature outlines limitations or restrictions on ingredients such as perfluorinated compounds, flame retardants, phthalate (plasticizers), isocyanate-based polyurethane, and urea-formaldehyde.

  • Feature 26, part 1

    • To minimize the impact of hazardous building material ingredients on indoor air quality and help support the health manufacturing and maintenance workers, this feature outlines requirements for voluntary product screening programs for 25% of all furnishings, built-in furniture, interior finishes, and finish materials (calculated by cost).

  • Feature 28, part 2

    • To reduce occupant exposure to pathogens on high-touch surfaces, this feature outlines requirements for material properties and cleanability.

MIND

Optimizations:

  • Feature 88, part 2

    • To nurture the innate human-nature connection within the project, this feature outlines opportunities for flooring, furniture, furnishings to contribute to overall biophilic design and natural pattern incorporation strategies.

  • Feature 97

    • To promote material transparency along the supply chain, this feature outlines transparency and accessibility to material ingredient exposures.

CONTRIBUTING FEATURE SET

Separate to WELL features with explicit requirements for product specifications, furniture and flooring can also contribute to the achievement of several other WELL features. Below is a list of features where furniture and flooring products can indirectly support the achievement beyond the previously listed feature set.

AIR

Preconditions:

  • Feature 1, part 1

    • To promote a basic level of high indoor air quality, this feature outlines performance-based thresholds for several categories of air pollutants. Material selection within flooring, furniture, and furnishing can contribute to overall indoor air quality.

COMFORT

Optimizations:

  • Feature 80

    • To reduce sound reverberation and maintain comfortable sound levels through absorptive ceilings and wall surfaces, this feature outlines requirements for noise reduction coefficients (NRC) for ceilings and walls. Flooring, furniture, and furnishings can contribute to spatial acoustic levels

MIND

Precondition:

  • Feature 87

    • To promote occupant comfort and spatial familiarity by designing spacious, familiar and aesthetically appealing spaces, this feature outlines requirements for ceiling height, artwork, and spatial familiarity and furniture and flooring can contribute to these overall strategies.

INNOVATION

Optimizations:

  • Feature 101 to 105

    • To promote the continuous evolution of the standard by enabling projects to propose a new feature that addresses health and wellness in a novel way.

Does your product meet the requirements of WELL features? Please review the below excerpts from our trademark guidelines before creating marketing or promotional materials.

Logos on product packaging

The International WELL Building InstituteTM ("IWBITM") does not review, certify or endorse products. As such, trademarked logos may not be used to indicate any kind of endorsement by IWBI of any product or service, to indicate that any official status for any product or service has been conferred by, or is otherwise associated with IWBI. Logos may not be placed on product packaging under any circumstances.

Referencing the WELL Building Standard in product literature

Manufacturers may reference the WELL Building Standard in their product literature, provided that the language does not state or imply endorsement by IWBI or the WELL Building Standard. The language must clearly acknowledge that WELL requirements cover the performance of materials, not the performance of the individual products or brands. Products that can be used to satisfy the WELL performance criteria can only contribute toward earning points required for WELL Certification; they cannot be said to earn points toward WELL Certification on their own.

Keep in touch! In 2018, we will be convening advisories to formally solicit the feedback from the manufacturing community that will be used to inform the next evolution of WELL.

Stephen serves as the Vice President of Business Development at IWBI. He has an extensive global network and brings knowledge of interior solutions from over 25 years supporting product manufacturers in residential and commercial markets.